Annual and transition report of foreign private issuers pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

4. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES: j) Impairment of non-financial assets (Policies)

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4. SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES: j) Impairment of non-financial assets (Policies)
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Policies  
j) Impairment of non-financial assets

j)Impairment of non-financial assets 

At each date of the consolidated statements of financial position, the Company reviews the carrying amounts of its non-financial assets to determine whether there is an indication that those assets have suffered an impairment loss. If any such indication exists, or when annual impairment testing for an asset is required, the recoverable amount of the asset is estimated in order to determine the extent of the impairment loss (if any). Where it is not possible to estimate the recoverable amount of an individual asset, the Company estimates the recoverable amount of the cash generating unit to which the assets belong.

The recoverable amount is the higher of fair value less costs of disposal and value in use. In assessing the value in use, the estimated future cash flows are discounted to their present value using a pre-tax discount rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and the risks specific to the asset.

In determining fair value less costs of disposal, recent market transactions are taken into account. If no such transactions can be identified, an appropriate valuation model is used. These calculations are corroborated by valuation multiples, quoted share prices for publicly traded companies or other available fair value indicators. If the recoverable amount of an asset (or cash generating unit) is estimated to be less than its carrying amount, the carrying amount of the asset (or cash generating unit) is reduced to its recoverable amount. An impairment loss is recognized immediately in the consolidated statements of comprehensive loss, unless the relevant asset is carried at a re-valued amount, in which case the impairment loss is treated as a revaluation decrease.

Where an impairment loss subsequently reverses, the carrying amount of the asset (cash generating unit) is increased to the revised estimate of its recoverable amount, but so that the increased carrying amount does not exceed the carrying amount that would have been determined had no impairment loss been recognized for the asset (or cash generating unit) in prior years. A previously recognised impairment loss is reversed only if there has been a change in the assumptions used to determine the asset’s recoverable amount since the last impairment loss was recognised.

To date the Company has not recognized any impairment losses.